Far Cry 4: Creatively Approaching Death & Destruction

In the last decade there has been a surge of games focussed on building and creating, rather than experiencing a prepared Hollywood influenced narrative or one long corridor of goons and explosions.

These games primarily give players a set of tools and a few basic tasks to guide the player’s creative endeavours; these tasks are often optional.

Primary examples of this are Minecraft and Little Big Planet, both of which focus on creation and a have made a lot of money.

Turns out players enjoy ‘creating’ as much as ‘experiencing’, and such games have aroused the same creative juices that Lego and Mechano have evoked in many a wannabe-architect’s life.

There are many games that embrace this with map and character creators, but this is usually a mere additional feature or means for some minor personal input rather than a pure creation agency encouraged by freedom and a set of building blocks.

The player becomes the director rather than viewer in creation games.

Games such as Little Big Planet and Minecraft are notoriously time consuming despite intuitive controls and gradual learning curve. Some gamers don’t have the time to invest in such games or they prefer a little more guidance and less overwhelming freedom.

This isn’t to say such players are less creative or committed, it just takes a certain type of gamer to create something like this.

That’s where creatively destructive games come in Continue reading

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