Scratching the Itch 2-4

 

In episode 4, Luke and Gareth are joined by the best voice in the business, Lauren Aitken (@L_Aitken)

We talk about Where the Goats Are by Memory of God, a meditative farming game about milking goats in the face of the apocalypse.

 

In episode 3, Luke and Gareth are joined by the ever affable Callum Agnew (@AlwaysAgnew).

We talk about Emily Mitchell’s Fractured Minds, story/puzzle game about living with anxiety and other mental health issues.

Fractured Minds won a 2017 BAFTA award for gaming: 15-18 years.

In episode 2, Luke and Gareth talk about Date (Almost) Anything, a game about coffee, love and everything in between.

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Batmobile Coming to Rocket League

The most exciting thing about Zack Snyder’s upcoming Batman Vs Superman is that its Batmobile is coming to the still very addictive Rocket League.  Check out the overly dramatic advert:

The Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice Car Pack drops on 8th March, and already looks better than the film. 

Because the film looks shit.

Fate & Fortune – Uncharted 4 Story Trailer

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Sony just released a story trailer for Uncharted 4 in anticipation of its late April release.

While much can be said about the bombast and action, two things stand out in the trailer: fate and fortune.

It seems to be traditional pulp affair, with Nathan Drake’s now quiet life being interrupted by the convenient plot of a long lost older brother appearing to entice Nathan into one last adventure.  You know, the adventure they’ve worked for their entire life.

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Far Cry 4: Creatively Approaching Death & Destruction

In the last decade there has been a surge of games focussed on building and creating, rather than experiencing a prepared Hollywood influenced narrative or one long corridor of goons and explosions.

These games primarily give players a set of tools and a few basic tasks to guide the player’s creative endeavours; these tasks are often optional.

Primary examples of this are Minecraft and Little Big Planet, both of which focus on creation and a have made a lot of money.

Turns out players enjoy ‘creating’ as much as ‘experiencing’, and such games have aroused the same creative juices that Lego and Mechano have evoked in many a wannabe-architect’s life.

There are many games that embrace this with map and character creators, but this is usually a mere additional feature or means for some minor personal input rather than a pure creation agency encouraged by freedom and a set of building blocks.

The player becomes the director rather than viewer in creation games.

Games such as Little Big Planet and Minecraft are notoriously time consuming despite intuitive controls and gradual learning curve. Some gamers don’t have the time to invest in such games or they prefer a little more guidance and less overwhelming freedom.

This isn’t to say such players are less creative or committed, it just takes a certain type of gamer to create something like this.

That’s where creatively destructive games come in Continue reading

Main Course: Far Cry 4 review – creatively destructive

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About three hours into Far Cry 4’s campaign I decided to climb some towers and reveal more of my map. This was a chore I had been avoiding since the first obligatory tower. I hopped into a buzzer – the game’s lightweight helicopter – and flew to the nearest tower which sat half way up a mountain, surrounded by lush trees.

I ditched the buzzer on an out‑of‑sight cliff a short distance from the patrolling guards, and proceeded to grapple nearer to the tower. Plan A was to throw some bait near my enemies so that a bear or snow leopard would clear out the area for me, but the game politely prompted me that no animal was interested in the bait. Plan B was to sniper my enemies from afar and stealthily pick off any stragglers. From my position I could only see one guard, so I took him out before edging closer with bow and arrow in hand.

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Gotta climb ’em all

I took shelter in a nearby bush and aimed my bow’s crosshair at the unsuspecting head of a nearby guard. Before I had the chance to shoot, I heard a grunt and squeak from behind and was suddenly attacked. I turned around to see a disgruntled boar head-butting my legs. Whether it was of poor self-control or lack of forethought, I quickly ran backwards, recklessly firing arrows at the boar. Continue reading

Main course: Destiny review

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When I first sat down to play Destiny, I had readied myself with six A4 pages to jot notes on. After a few weeks playing I have only scribbled on three of those pages. This doesn’t indicate how good or bad Bungie’s latest is, but it certainly shows how little there is to say about it.

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